Tag Archives: YouTube

Ben’s Chili Bowl: Where hot dogs and politics come together

By Edith Leung

Nothing says “America” like a hot dog, and that’s more true at Ben’s Chili Bowl than anywhere else.  The Washington establishment, which has 54 years of history, is as famous for its American politics and celebrities as it is for its hot dogs.

The restaurant, at 1213 U Street, is well-known for its chili dogs, half-smokes and milkshakes. It has been an integral part of the neighborhood since its founding in 1958. The restaurant is in a historically African-American neighborhood, a stone’s throw away from Howard University. Inside, the walls are covered with photos of celebrities including U.S. Secretary of State Hillary Rodham Clinton and comedian Bill Cosby (who took his future wife to Ben’s when they  were dating).

President Obama has also visited the restaurant, which is known to attract Obama supporters.

So how did this eatery become such a popular hangout for political buffs?

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Early voting plays a more important role for citizens and campaigns

By Karen Chan

More early votes are expected in this election as more people take advantage of the practice and campaigners talk it up.

Voters line up outside Judiciary Square in Washington to cast their ballots early.

Early voting, which was first offered in 1992, allows people in 32 states and Washington DC to cast their ballots by November 4. Election day is November 6 this year. The practice has become more popular in the last decade. The percentage of votes that come in early increased from 7% in 1992 to 30% in 2008, according to the latest statistics.

“Early voting is more and more important because an increasing number of states is allowing people to vote earlier. It is estimated that one third of voters cast their ballots before election day,” says William Galston, a former policy advisor to former president Bill Clinton.

Recently, the Republican Party urged members of the military to vote in advance, but Galston said the call to vote early would not matter much.

“Military people who have a sense of duty will vote anyway, the only question is when,” Galston said.

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